For $21,900, Is This 1983 Plymouth Sapporo a Deal?

Good Price or No Dice 1983 Plymouth Sapporo

Advertisement for today good price or no dice Plymouth claims it has to be “the best on the planet”. Let’s see if it’s also the best value on the globe.

tomorrow’s vote 1986 Toyota Van Most of the day was a nail-biter. Opinion on the van’s $6,500 asking price fluctuated between a skin-to-tooth win and an equally narrow loss. In the end, it was the slender teeth that ruled the day, giving Toyota a 52 percent Nice Price win.

I think it’s safe to say that, in part, the ’80s represented the beginning of the modern era as it is today. After all, this was the decade that saw the rise of the personal computer and mobile phone, as well as the beginning of both. McRib Sandwich and Hammer Pants. What is the time to live

In the 80s an auto industry was also on full swing. The ’70s had proved cruel for car lovers that rising gas prices and demands for reduction in emissions cut the metaphor of most engines. By the ’80s, the industry had gotten its act together and figured out how to make cars both clean and compelling. Of course, that meant they could be fun again too.

Image for article titled For $21,900 Could this 1983 Plymouth Sapporo be a captured import that captures your heart?

A fun car of the ’80s was the Plymouth Sapporo, which was actually a Mitsubishi, but sold almost identically under both the Dodge and Plymouth brands; at the time, Mitsubishi was not selling its merchandise in the US.

First introduced in 1976, Sapporo takes its name from the Japanese city on the island of Hokkaido, nestled among snow-capped peaks and famous for producing some dangerously-delicious beers. Mitsubishi built the two-door personal coupe on its Galant (Colt in the US) platform and powered it with a range of small to medium-sized four-cylinder engines.

Image for article titled For $21,900 Could this 1983 Plymouth Sapporo be a captured import that captures your heart?

Despite being sold through two different brands and lasting two generations, the Sapporo never made it as big in the US as the Toyota Celica or Ford Mustang. Sales closed in 1983 with the opening of Diamond-Star Motors, a Chrysler/Mitsubishi joint venture, which eventually saw Mitsubishi sell its products in the US under its own name. Sapporo would survive a fashion following, as the stage served as the basis for the later and better remembered Starion.

Image for article titled For $21,900 Could this 1983 Plymouth Sapporo be a captured import that captures your heart?

This 1983 Plymouth Sapporo Comes from that last year of production. Or maybe it comes from a museum. It’s hard to tell because its condition and remarkably low 13,504 odometer reading certainly don’t speak to years of normal use and abuse.

Image for article titled For $21,900 Could this 1983 Plymouth Sapporo be a captured import that captures your heart?

It’s hard to understand why people hold onto certain things. The Sapporo isn’t exactly the kind of car you’d ever imagine would be wildly collectible in the future, and yet, here we are.

The car presents itself in almost new condition, with shiny metallic bronze paint and a textile and vinyl interior that’s jaw-dropping to the ’80s. The coupe’s styling is not particularly noteworthy, although it is reminiscent of the Mustang of the same era. Everything from the glass to the badging, dare I say it, in perfect condition.

Image for article titled For $21,900 Could this 1983 Plymouth Sapporo be a captured import that captures your heart?

Two sets of wheels and tires come with the car – the basic steel wheel and cover combo and a nice set of gold basket alloys. The Inspire is 100 horsepower through a 2.6-liter SOHC four, and it’s mated to a five-speed manual transmission. The car comes with a working A/C and power assist for both steering and brakes. The seller claims that the car was owned by the same family and had a recent service to make sure it lasted. According to the ad, the title is as clean as the car.

Image for article titled For $21,900 Could this 1983 Plymouth Sapporo be a captured import that captures your heart?

Finding a Sapporo in this good shape is somewhat shocking. That’s not a bad thing, it’s just surprising. Should anyone be interested in living the ’80s lifestyle, this is certainly a unique opportunity to do so. At $21,900, this is also a fairly expensive opportunity. However, the fact is, without breaking into the Petersen Museum and breaking into one of the basements, you’re unlikely to find many cars from this era in this good shape. Reflecting on that idea, I’m pretty sure Peterson doesn’t have one of these. Maybe the museum should buy it?

Failing that path, we now need to decide whether this time capsule is worth it. What do you think, should anyone shell out $21,900 for this unique and vintage—but not really, really old—Plymouth? Or, is it too much of a ticket down memory lane for a car that most people have long forgotten?

You decide!

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H/T to Stephen Rivers for the hookup!

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