For $10,000, Is This 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur a Deal?

Good Price or No Dice 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur

Used to advertise as Rolls Royce That, in motion, the only thing you could hear was the ticking of the clock. Today’s good price or no dice Flying Spur is a prime opportunity to test that claim. That is if one doesn’t chime in on the price.

In car sales, as in life, presentation is everything. In the case of Factory Five Racing Cobra We saw yesterday, she was looking for a presentation. Showing clear signs of an engine bay Past cooling system issues And very modern wheels were the downfall of the car. Not helping was the $33,900 asking price. He too 83 percent fell in no dice loss.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of yesterday’s cobra was its hand-crafted nature. To save everything about the car The drivetrain was art and was designed to exist. Few production cars can make it same claim. Today’s 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur the one who can

Image for article titled $10,000 Would you work in the lap of luxury in this 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur?

until a mutual friend introduced Charles Rolls Two Henry Royce in 1904, the latter He had already made four automobiles under his own name. Rolls was importing other people at the time Automobiles from France and selling them through their dealership, CS Rolls & Co. When not asked by potential buyers “what can I do to keep you in this car today,” Rolls pursued a hobby as an aviator. It would be the hobby that would prove his downfall as Rolls became notable for being the first Brit to die in an airplane crash. At that time he was only 32 years old, And the year was 1910. Fourteen years Rolls’ senior, Henry Royce outlived his partner for another 23 years, eventually Died in 1933 due to ill health.

Image for article titled $10,000 Would you work in the lap of luxury in this 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur?

However, by then, Rolls-Royce Limited had established itself as one of the leading builders of high quality, non-commodity motor vehicles, not only in Great Britain, but in the world. Every car that has followed since has attempted to live up to the legacy set by Charles Rolls and Henri Royce.

This 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur Looks as a fancy car as you can imagine. In front of the terraced, elegant bodywork is the marque’s most recognizable styling element, a Parthenon-inspired grille topped with the iconic Flying Lady mascot. Painted in an iconic cream and accented with chrome-plated copious amounts of bright work wheels, it still presents an air of dignity and seriousness.

Image for article titled $10,000 Would you work in the lap of luxury in this 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur?

Of course, that timeless exterior style aims to impress others. This is Connolly leather, wool carpet, and woodworking interior who wants impression They Lucky to be seated in the cabin of the car. Everything here, from the pretty asymmetrical upholstery piping to the fold-down picnic table in the back, looks decent Shape. Killing the experience somewhat, there is some entry scuffle on driver seat base and something faintly fluffy floor mats to contend with.

The Flying Spur weighs in at about 5,452 pounds and requires a good oomph to get around. That oomph is provided by a 6.75-litre pushrod V8 that in flying spur Shown a turbocharger. Famously, Rolls-Royce never published power specifications for the engine, choosing instead to describe it as “adequate” for the task. Contemporary Estimates on Peg Actual Production somewhere around 360 horsepower.

A four-speed automatic transmission sourced from General Motors does the shifting duty here. According to the ad, that combo has only pushed the car 33,667 miles.

Image for article titled $10,000 Would you work in the lap of luxury in this 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur?

Only 92 Flying Spurs with left-hand drive were ever built, making it a fairly rare automobile. Being a Rolls-Royce, it One should also be expected to be dear enough to maintain. At $10,000, it’s surprisingly affordable to buy, but that price tag does come with a few caveats. The first is an ad that highlights the danger description. The seller says the car is in “excellent condition,” but then claims they “need it to go.” One person’s excellence is another’s nightmare, so take it with a grain of gray poppies. The second issue is a missing title. Seller claims to have proof of ownership, but in many areas Buying this car will require some DMV calisthenics and the involvement of the selling party to fix it.

Image for article titled $10,000 Would you work in the lap of luxury in this 1995 Rolls-Royce Flying Spur?

What do you think, $10,000 is a fair value considering an automobile that is so luxurious and plush but comes with some unknown history, and without any Topic? Or, is it just too much?

You decide!

Facebook Marketplace out of Portland, Oregon, or go Here If the ad disappears.

H/T to Bill Lyons for the hookup!

Help me with NPOND. kill me rob@jalopnik.com And send me a fixed price tip. Remember to include your Kinja handle.

nonton the naked director season 2

Leave a Comment